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Art Inspires Art   2 comments

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Author Christina Baker Kline brings “Christina’s World,” the painting by Andrew Wyeth, to life in her novel, A Piece of the World.

Kline blends reality with imagination as she recounts Christina Olson’s life, the woman who provided friendship, hospitality and inspiration to the young artist. It begins in 1939 when Christina first meets Wyeth. The story is also told in flashbacks to the late 1800s when as a young child she’s stricken with a neurological disorder that affects her legs and hands. The story chronologically alternates between each time period: the former illustrates the relationship between Christina and Wyeth; the latter tells of her life and family history. Christina and her brother, Al, live in the house in which they were born. It’s been in the family since the mid-1700s.

Christina’s existence is full of hardships and disappointments. Kline’s portrait of her subject doesn’t gloss over the hardscrabble difficulties of living on a remote farm near a small coastal town in Maine. The descriptions are vivid and at times painful as Christina’s dreams are repeatedly cast aside. Yet, she is not a character who evokes pity. She is strong-willed and often frustratingly stubborn.

Wyeth’s character is more of a supporting character. For 20 years he comes and goes in the summer months using the Olson house as his studio while bringing Christina out of her past and her reclusive ways.

In addition to the rich images of the landscape and people, Kline’s fusion of fact and fiction is creative and engaging.

A Piece of The World
Four Bookmarks
William Morrow Publishers, 2017
310 pages

 

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2 responses to “Art Inspires Art

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  1. Thanks for the insight and review! It sounds like all the parts of a great read for me……history, art Wyeth family…….great read!!!

  2. I loved this read especially after having the picutre of Christina’s World hang above my parent’s bed for years. What a message to see beyond a person’s handicap. I highly recommend this book.

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