Advertisements

Archive for the ‘Los Angeles Times’ Tag

LA Food Bowl Part I   Leave a comment

Iranian rest

The Los Angeles Times Food Bowl is more than a celebration of food, although it certainly plays a major role. It’s also about the city’s culture and the various neighborhoods comprising the metropolitan area. Each contributes to the literal and figurative flavor of the city. Time constraints restricted us to only two of the month-long events – although we did dine at other restaurants during my recent five-day visit.

Iranian dinner menu

Every Wednesday in May Momed has offered an “Immigrant Dinner” featuring cuisine organized by an immigrant friend of the restaurant. We hit on Taste of Iran with guest chef Bita Milanian. The menu featured two appetizers and three entrees. We ordered one of everything. The most unusual, or new to me, was the Borani-e-labu. Diced roasted beets mixed with Persian yogurt gave this soupy, savory starter the color of cotton candy. (Sorry no photos.) The only problem was not enough pita with which to sop it up.

Iranian meatballEach entrée featured a blend of ingredients rendering it new to the palate: Kufteh: combined fresh herbs, ground beef, rice, barberries and walnuts. This was softball-size in shape and dressed with roasted yellow and red peppers.

Iranian chickenFava beans, lentils, pomegranate seeds, citrus, raisins, other rices and dates were among other components incorporated into the dishes.

Momed is short for Modern Mediterranean. It’s located in a residential area of Atwater Village.

Momed

3245 Casitas Ave.

Los Angeles, Calif.

Advertisements

Food Bowl Part III   Leave a comment

Downtime cover

The month-long Los Angeles Times Food Bowl is over. I was there for a week and participated in three and a half (I’ll explain this) events. My clothes are still a little snug even though only one of the activites I attended did not involve eating. That was the Q&A session with cookbook author Nadine Levy Redzepi and LA Times dining critic Jonathan Gold.

Nadine Rezepi

She’s married to chef Rene Redzepi of Noma fame. Although she works with her husband at the Copenhagen restaurant, Nadine deserves her own spotlight thanks to her new cookbook, “Downtime.” The recipes, designed as easy-to-prepare, flavorful and for simple at-home dining, are what she serves family and friends.

Nadine’s intelligence, passion for food and humor shone during the hour-long discussion. Gold’s questions and demeanor were less impressive. Clearly he knows food, but his interviewing skills could use some work – along with his wardrobe.

Jonathan Gold

Nadine’s interest in food developed well before meeting her husband. Her parents were buskers and when they had a particularly good day in earnings, the family celebrated by going out to a nice meal. “Food was an adventure for us,” she said. Her talk, and her cookbook, let the audience share in the fun.

 

Oh, that half event: gelato at Gelateria Uli which participated in the Food Bowl by offering different flavors suggestive of Los Angeles. It was horchata the day we stopped in, but I was too tempted by other flavors: white chocolate banana and peanut chocolate chip, for example.

Gelateria Uli
541 S. Spring St.
Los Angeles, Calif.

More Food Bowl   Leave a comment

 

20180518_194306_001The Night Market, a five-day festival of food trucks/pop-up restaurants, is part of the Los Angeles Food Bowl. The entire month-long event not only appeals to foodies but is also meant to raise awareness of issues such as hunger, sustainability, food waste, among others. Some events are free, others cost as much as $150 per person. Proceeds go to help fund the above.

The Night Market features an array of food options ranging from tacos to doughnuts, fried chicken to lobster rolls, from ice cream to bahn mi. I learned it’s important to have an appetite, cash or credit card readily accessible.

20180518_183913_001.jpg

It was fitting that our first stop was Kogi food truck, the precursor of the genre, a giant leap from those food trucks once known as roach coaches that sold packaged food. The short rib taco marries Mexican and Korean flavors. Savory and sweet tender pieces of meat topped with spicy kimchi on soft corn tortillas.

20180518_183436

Several fried  chicken options were available. We considered chicken coated with granola, chicken with waffles and settled on a buttermilk fried chicken slider with siracha. Oh, and French fries with fried chicken bacon, cheese and cilantro.

I expected the event to be larger, both in the scope of participating vendors and attendees. This isn’t a complaint, but a selfish observation regarding the former, not the latter.

Live music, mixed drinks, beer and wine on a cool, clear, May evening created a festive atmosphere for a good cause and a good time.

Taco Tour   1 comment

Back-to-back taco tastings at two Los Angeles taquerias may not constitute a true test, but it did provide a fun opportunity for comparison – plus alliteration. Both Mexicali Taco & Co. and Yuca’s have garnered a lot of ink in The Los Angeles Times, mainly thanks to critic Jonathan Gold; all of it well deserved.

I first heard of Mexicali Taco several years ago in a Gold review. What I recall is that the owners travel to Baja a few times a week for the tortillas. While I think there are plenty of good tortillerias in East L.A., I appreciate Mexicali’s efforts. They are worth it. We ordered carne asada tacos. The meat comes almost naked on a plate, wrapped only in a soft tortilla. A grilled scallion is added for can only be color. It was the carne we were after, but a small salsa bar features a few different heat levels, pickled onions, radishes, slaw, cucumbers and lime. The charred diced meat is surprisingly tender.

However, Yuca’s carne asada is a bit more flavorful. These feature grilled pieces of meat with fresh onion, tomatoes and cilantro. They don’t need anything else except two corn tortillas, which don’t hold up well. Yuca’s offers a few outdoor tables, otherwise plan to eat in your car – if you can’t wait to get home.

The best of the taco world, where these two are concerned, would be Mexicali’s tortillas because they hold up well and have a distinct corn taste, and Yuca’s melt-in-your-mouth carne asada.

Mexicali’s Taco & Co. 
Four Plates
702 N. Figueroa St.
Los Angeles

Yuca’s
Four Plates
2056 Hillhurst Ave.
Los Angeles